Jongens

I just finished watching this sweet little Dutch film called Jongens. It chronicles the blossoming romance between two young boys, Sieger and Marc, who both run for a relay track team. Usually, when I watch LGBT films, I do so to study how the tension and chemistry is treated between the couple. Interestingly enough, with this little film, the character that ended up impressing me the most was Sieger’s best friend, Stef. At one point, near the middle of the story, Stef becomes aware of what’s going on between his best friend and Marc. He is the only one who knows, and keeps his peace, but has these moments in the film when he shows concern for Marc and Sieger after they fall out. Near the end of the film, after the boys’ relay team has won the national championship race (thanks to Marc and Sieger’s uncanny timing together), Stef and Sieger are in his kitchen preparing for a celebratory dinner. Stef takes this rare moment of opportunity to tell Sieger, in an awkward-teenage-male-best friend-indirect way, that he is totally supportive of Sieger’s sexuality and his love for Marc. It’s completely unexpected, and by *far* the most beautiful scene in the film- I watched it several times. The dialogue is sparse, but well chosen (God I love foreign film), and the loving acceptance that passes from Stef to Sieger with their silent looks at one another is absolutely breathtaking. I’ve taken note of this scene because of how it was done- It’s so original, innocent, unbelievably moving. The entire film was sweet, really, but this scene made my week. Unexpected in the best way possible- we all expect, as the audience, that when Stef finds out about Sieger and Marc that it will end the friendship. I LOVE that it instead gives us this amazing exchange between the two friends.

This character, Stef, is the essence of Anteros. In the last scene of the film, Sieger decides to leave the celebration, and to find Marc- the look on Stef’s face is gorgeous. He knows where Sieger is going, and he’s giving him his silent and loving support. Anteros. Requited love. I tried to find a clip of this scene, but couldn’t. It’s on Netflix instant. Those two little scenes are worth the entire film itself.

(Thank God for foreign film. By the way, I haven’t seen a film yet from the Netherlands that I haven’t liked. They, and Scandanavia too, seem to have a master grasp on how to translate deep emotion into film using as little dialogue as possible. Absolutely adore their style.)

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~ by hln351 on March 10, 2015.

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